Monthly Archives: April 2011

3 Marketing Tips You Can Learn From A Kindergartner

By Frankie Frederick, Guest Writer
Published April 1, 2011

Reality check! Kindergartners are better at marketing than you or I might ever be. How can that be? You’ve studied, taken the tests, got the certifications.

Never mind the pint sized cuteness and rambunctious energy that makes the Energizer Bunny look…well more like the tortoise than the hare.

Forget that a five year old can get massive amounts of attention at the mere mention of poop, walking up to the front door covered head to toe in mud, or have an entire mall looking with a simple fall on the floor tantrum.

No, if you want to truly learn how to market your brand. If you want to really find out how to create an experience, ask a kindergartner. Here’s why:

1. Wild Imagination

A five year old can tell the best stories. They don’t have to be true, but they can suck almost anyone in with vivid, wild imagination. No stone is left unturned and childlike details create an experience.

Need a superhero to represent your brand? Ask a kindergartner. They’ll have the best ones. Want to create a video about cute? Ask a kindergartner. They know cute beyond our jaded, seen it all eyes. Need to write a sequence of blogs in storyline format? Ask a kindergartner. You’re sure to get a great story idea.

See, most of us are limited in our imaginations. We are realists, logical, rational, always thinking about the perceptions of our ideas and the results of our efforts. We think to ourselves, “that won’t work”. Yet, a five year old has almost no concept of these things and thus runs wild with creative imagination.

2. Won’t Bore You

Have you every seen a boring child? I’ll bet you haven’t seen too many, if at all. Yet, I know we’ve all seen a ton of boring adults and well…boring brands.

We want to be “safe”, “informative” and “thought leaders”. (YAWN! SNORE!).

“The housing market is down and here is what you can do to get this house quick!”

Whoopee!

The five year old says, “Housing Market? I wanna slide down that bannister! I want to do flips into the pool. This is a cool house!”

The idea is, while we worry about making people laugh or cry, the five year old doesn’t care and he/she provides the great experience that isn’t well…boring.

3. Fearlessness

Children get so excited to attempt things without thought or fear of failure. Sometimes they fall down. But, often times, they get back up and try it again until they get it right.

As marketers, we on the other hand fear attempting something new or different. We fear backlash at our ideas, we fear failure.

Kids like to push boundaries. That’s how they discover what works and what doesn’t. That lack of fear leads to an amazing amount of knowledge in a short time. We, on the other hand don’t push boundaries, don’t discover as much as we could and therefore don’t get the attention and recognition our brands deserve.

Next time you’re trying to figure out how to develop your marketing campaign, go ask a kindergartner.